Accomodation

Since Estonian Business School does not have a dormitory on-site, our international students usually rent private apartments and often two or three students share bigger apartments. Splitting the rent among few people may offer an opportunity to find great accommodation at an affordable price.

 

Private rooms or flats can be found through newspaper advertisements, websites or real estate agencies operating in the city. Prices can vary widely depending on the number of rooms and facilities offered. Also, price difference can depend on the preferences of the student.

 

EBS is in the city center, so renting a flat near-by is the most convenient option. Rental prices in the center may be a bit more expensive but one can cut costs and time on transportation.

 

On closing a rental deal, be prepared to pay a deposit. Generally, the deposit is the equivalent of three months’ rent; one month’s rent will be returned to you upon your departure, provided that the accommodation is left in acceptable condition.

 

We suggest that you turn to your tutor from EBS International Club for assistance once looking for the apartment. 

Areas in Tallinn

  • Vanalinn (Old town) beautiful but rather expensive.  You will be living in the historic center of Tallinn and in a well-preserved modernized medieval building. The old town is popular amongst tourists and students and can get crowded on the weekends. Very international atmosphere.

  • Kesklinn (city center) - modern district is home to many businesses, restaurants, shops, and banks. Living in the center, it is the densest and busiest that you can get in Tallinn. The city center is considered the meeting place of Tallinn and gives you the opportunity to stay well-connected with everyone. The city center offers a great mix of new and old buildings and prices vary a lot depending on the condition of the buildings. Due to closeness to everywhere, rental-and sales prices in central Tallinn are higher compared to the rest of the city.  Older houses might have wood-heating and parking in the central area is paid.

  • Kadriorg & Kalamaja – rather close to city center and popular amongst students. Mostly older buildings can be found in those areas, but sometimes you could get good deals with the apartments.
    • Kalamaja is the most “hipster” place in Tallinn - it is characterized by small cozy wooden buildings, some of which are very nicely renovated, whereas some are in very bad shape. Do some research beforehand.  The former industrial complex that now has been turned into the creative center of Estonia where artists, music promoters and community activists mingle with the startup community.
    • Kadriorg is one of the most loved residential areas of the town, the streets of Kadriorg are filled with cute small wooden houses and functionalist apartment buildings. Probably the most romantic and beautiful area of the capital. Quiet and cozy, not far from the seaside. However, apartment prices can range a lot. Many of the houses have wood-heating.
  • Põhja-Tallinn - excellent transportation connection to the center, near the seaside. Most of the houses were built between the 19th and 20th centuries. It's filled with atmospheric wooden houses initially built for workers of the expanding industry.
  • Kristiine & Uus-Maailm – affordable apartments and not far from the city center. 
    • Uus-Maailm - is considered to be the most bohemian spot in town, where people are relaxed and open to change. It’s on the edge of the city center.
    • Kristiine - Very close to the center, but away from the busy vibe. Kristiine is a versatile district, that includes private residential areas, more densely populated apartment building regions and business-and industrial area. 
  • Nõmme, Mustamäe, Õismäe – away from the city center, 30 to 50 min bus ride depending on the connection. These areas are quiet and away from busy city life. You can find all kinds of people there – local families, working-class, students. 

More information about different areas of Tallinn can be found on WorkInEstonia and MoveMyTalent.

Looking for accommodation

 The most useful and effective ways of finding accommodation have proven to be:  

Real estate sites: 

Facebook groups to find accommodation:  
Eramus in Tallinn/accommodation 

 

What to keep in mind if you decide to rent the apartment? 

  • Renting the apartment is a legal process – you should have a contract, all the agreements are set in the contract.
  • You should also check if that kind of address exists and if the person who calls themselves „owner“ of the apartment actually exists.
  • Make sure that the landlord has the owner’s authorization. Sometimes the owner and landlord are not the same person. Read the contract before signing it.
  • If you cannot understand all the parts in the contract – ask someone to translate it for you.
  • Don’t send out money beforehand (before you see the apartment). Check the apartment before you move in with the owner.
  • Utilities part should be brought out in the contract (like electricity, gas, water, etc). If they are not in the contract you pay rent + utilities will be additionally added. If from the utilities only gas, electricity, water and heat, then  the owner can’t ask you for an extra fee.